1. Varg Vikernes has made several videos on the topic of reincarnation, for example this. In his understanding, children would go to their ancestral burial mound and identify their last life’s bones and items, in order to know who they were. Judging from myself and those i know, we can be reborn across a great distance, and seemingly into quite different genetic groups – for example, two of my last-life siblings (Ashkenazi Jews) are now Finnish, and i am Anglo-Indian. Both my Finnish once-were-siblings look extremely Finnish to me, and genetically the Finns seem to be quite distinct from e.g. Germans or Jews. Nonetheless, we all have “the look” of our last lives.

2. Plump bourgeois of the managerial class assume that the reality which has made them so comfortably well-off has always and will always obtain. But in fact humanity can change radically.

There could have been a time when reincarnation was mostly within the close genetic group, and also when it was easier to remember. Our metaphysical frame and potential changes over centuries. This is one reason modern men often assume e.g. Herodotus is total fiction: amid the presumably fantastical tales, there are probably a few which were true, because reality itself was different in those days.

3. Varg addresses the accusation of LARPing:

Today, conscious recall of a previous life – even fragmentary recall – is rare. For one thing, if your religion or irreligion tells you it is impossible the faint tuggings at awareness will be drowned out by your false imaginings.

Nonetheless, many people are influenced by a kind of unconscious memory. It manifests in preferences, aversions, skills. For example, most of my past lives were in some way scribal; and when i was 5 or 6 and we learnt how to handwrite (joined up, i think) by copying sentences from the blackboard; the other children would look up at the board after every single letter but i quickly found i could take in and remember two or three words in a glance and so i finished such exercises before the others – amusingly, my neighbour, a typically vicious female, hissed at me “you’re cheating!” – one of my first lessons in the tribal Social Justice Warrior nature of females, and the consequences of being in any way distinct from one’s fellows.

4. It’s unusual to remember past lives, because our memories are a chain of association and identity woven about the person we become aged about 5 or 6. Perhaps it is hard to remember infant memories for the same reason it’s hard to remember past lives – because our identity (about which memory coheres) dates from age 5 or so, and all before that is of a looser weave with our adult consciousness.

However, i note that when our present life mirrors a past (in clothing, residence, food, language) we seem more open to unconscious memory, as if the considerable gap between lives narrows when we follow the old ways. There then comes a power and a sense of being who one really is – which is what i felt in my four years at Durham; and this influence gave me the strength to break out of my misery and apathy in Manchester.

5. There would be clear advantages to recalling a past life: greater skill,  a broader perspective. Unconscious memory is however the norm in traditional societies: there is typically a fabric of rites and practices which join the present to the past, and so create an atmosphere of expanded temporality in which one could more easily draw upon what a millennial-old life has to offer: one does not actually remember anything, but one has a sense of familiarity, of ease and instinctual knowledge, and i would say a kind of happiness and feeling of being comprehended in a wider form of life and wider human experience. Today there are very few such rites.

The destruction of the old Catholic Mass took away one of the most widespread means of joining with one’s ancestors and European past lives. The Latin and the form would be the same over centuries, over different countries. Attending would create that charged field of awareness, in which one particular life is part of a greater continuum.

The globalists i guess thought of it as old-fashioned and stuffy and elitist; but their demonic masters knew the power of unchanging tradition: they knew that to destroy Europe and the white race, it would be necessary to break the weave of allegiance and observance stretching back centuries. Break that, and the people lose their unconscious memory, their fidelity and obligation to the past, their obligation to the future. And then they stop having children, and can be replaced by sand peoples – and they will even welcome their own destruction because for all their shiny trinkets and toys they are maddened by newfound isolation and vulnerability.

i’m not a huge fan of Christianity – as Varg and others have observed, it inculcates a sense that race is utterly unimportant, and it denies the possibility of reincarnation. That said, now the old Mass has been destroyed there is very little to preserve the weave of tradition necessary for a widespread, habitual fealty to one’s ancestry.

6. Some think the runes are themselves conscious; whether or not they are, fields of awareness and activity tend to persist a while, and will themselves into physical form. The next few years in Europe will most likely be years of great suffering and distress, and violence; and in such a time, the old forms will probably reassert themselves. When all of Western Europe resembles Mogadishu there may be enclaves of white Europeans holding up in the mountains, eating Schnitzel and drinking whisky, and Jacob Rees-Mogg will with his own hands build a stone chapel in which Benedict XVI will perform the old Mass while Varg and his twenty blond children run around slaughtering the invaders with neanderthal weaponry, and a good time will be had by all.

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